About Danny Iny, the Freddy Krueger of Blogging

Danny Iny, the Freddy Krueger of Blogging

If you clicked onto this page, it’s because of one of two reasons:

1. You’re interested in learning more about me in general, or

2. You want to know where the whole “Freddy Krueger” name came from, and whether I can help you!

If it’s the first reason, then just Google “Danny Iny”, and you’ll find a ton of stuff – no point rehashing it all here.

If it’s the second question, though, keep reading… ;-)

How I Became the Freddy Krueger of Blogging

It started innocently enough.

I was in Jon Morrow’s guest blogging program, and received the latest lesson in my inbox, explaining that list posts were the easiest way to break into a big blog, because they usually performed well and were exhausting to produce.

As luck would have it, I had just developed a curriculum of business books for a client. So I emailed Jon and asked him if he thought it would be a good fit for Copyblogger. Jon said that he couldn’t make any promises, but that I should send him a draft, so I worked my tail off to write a stellar post, and Copyblogger ran it.

The post performed well; 200+ comments, 900+ tweets, and tons of traffic back to Firepole Marketing. I even got an email from Guy Kawasaki (I had mentioned one of his books on the list) that eventually turned into an interview, book reviews, and Guy’s excellent contribution to my book Engagement from Scratch!.

I figured that since Copyblogger had worked so well, I’d try my hand at another guest post, and emailed Problogger to see if they wanted to publish the story of my experience.

It was a total shot in the dark, and there wasn’t any kind of “in” – just a cold email through the contact form. It was a long shot, but it never hurts to try. To my great (and pleasant) surprise, they went for it. The result was my first post on Problogger. This led to more notoriety, and more traffic back to Firepole Marketing.

I realized that guest blogging was a great idea, and that I needed to do more of it. But where? And how? I felt that I’d been lucky with Copyblogger and Problogger. What now? Who would take my posts? Who would even answer my emails?

I did some research, and made a list of blogs that I wanted to guest post on. (Interesting note: even though my first guest post was on Copyblogger, I was so intimidated by their size and quality that it took another 14 guest posts before I worked up the courage to pitch them again.)

I emailed about a dozen bloggers, figuring that I would probably only hear back from a fraction of them, and most of the responses would be rejections. At best, I was hoping to end up with one guest post, maybe two.

Oh, crap, they all said yes!

Except that it turns out that bloggers are a lot easier to reach than I thought they would be, and if you do your homework and make a solid, concise pitch, they’re likely to respond in your favor. And they did – all of them.

My first thought: “Great!”

My second thought: “Oh, crap, now I have to write a dozen posts, and I have to do it all in the next week or two!”

I was under the gun. This was a great opportunity, but if I blew it, or showed them that I wasn’t reliable, I probably wouldn’t get another chance.

So I buckled down and wrote.

And wrote.

And wrote.

And wrote some more.

Then the posts all started to go live.

And people started to notice me – everywhere.

So much so that Eugene Farber over at Content Strategy Hub left a comment on a few of my posts, saying “Wow, Danny, it’s like you’re Freddy Krueger. Wherever I turn, you’re there!”

And the rest, as they say, is history… ;-)

The Lesson That I Learned

Having all these guest posts run within a few weeks of each other was a happy accident, but I learned something very important from the experience: The value of guest posts increases exponentially with the number of concurrent posts that you write.

In other words, two simultaneous guest posts is worth a lot more than two individual posts, three are worth a LOT more than two, and so forth.

This returns to the truism we’ve all learned about the number of impressions you need to make in order for people to notice you, plus with people’s tendency to forget, and get distracted.
Imagine a “meter of attention.” Every time people see you, that meter inches higher. But then, whenever they aren’t seeing you, it slowly dips back down. Space your appearances out over a large period of time, and you lose much of the effect.

Do them at the same time, and you’ll see two benefits. Not only will you avoid losing momentum between posts, but people will also start talking about you, leading to even more attention and awareness. All of that comes together to move you past the threshold of “getting noticed”, and after that, it gets easier. You need less of an introduction because people already know who you are.

Except… how can you write so much good content, so quickly, and so consistently?

Starting to Write Like Freddy

I did it the first time because I had inadvertently put myself in a position where I just had to get it done – but if I was going to keep on doing it, I needed to develop a system for doing it all:

  • I needed to write a very large number of posts; averaging 5-30 posts per campaign, all going up in the same week.
  • The posts had to be very high quality, otherwise they wouldn’t get the results I wanted, and I wouldn’t be invited back.
  • I had to write them QUICKLY (because otherwise, how would it all get done?).
  • I had to be able to pitch ideas to a lot of blogs before writing anything, and have them accepted most of the time.
  • And finally, I needed a system that wouldn’t let me run out of ideas, or be stuck waiting for inspiration.

Well, that’s exactly the system that I developed, and I called it “Write Like Freddy”.

It worked wonders for me (check out the growth of Firepole Marketing!), and my students love it. So click here to read more about it!

And if you have any questions, I’m here to help. Even though they call me Freddy, I’m still a super-friendly guy – so send me an email and say hello!